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Kensington Primary School

Kensington Primary School

English

Reading at home

Please click the document above to support you in helping your child read at home

We love reading at our school. Look at all the fantastic reading activities we do!

Guided Reading

At Kensington, we have daily Guided Reading sessions in all classes and the teachers record children’s progress as they read. Guided Reading is where children are given opportunities to develop, practice and implement different reading skills. Small groups of children, working at a similar stage of reading, are taught explicit reading skills by a teacher. They will use a text that they have read on the previous day so they are already prepared to develop their key skills. 

Kensington Library

We are delighted to announce the opening of our own school library. We have thousands of books organised and accessible to pupils at Kensington. All classes have an allotted time during the week to visit the library where they can select a book of their choice and take these home to develop their reading. Children should be reading books they enjoy every day.

Home School Reading Diaries

To develop good home school links, we have ensured every child at Kensington has a home school reading diary. The reading diary is designed to enable children to record the books they are reading. The pupil, teacher or parents can then comment on what has been read. It is essential for children to take their home school reading diary to and from school each day to enable effective communication with parents and also ensure that children are reading every day. It is expected that children will have three to four home reading entries every week. These entries will be acknowledged when the diaries are checked and children will be praised by teachers.

Manor Park Library visits

Every pupil in KS1 and KS2 has been provided with an opportunity to visit our local library. Libraries are a free service available in the community, and we seek to support them by encouraging children and their families to visit. Children can do various activities and have the opportunity to borrow a range of books to read in a different and engaging context, again promoting children’s pleasure for reading. If you would like to visit the library with your child, please inform your child’s teacher.

Bug Club

Bug Club is a highly engaging whole-school reading programme with print and eBooks featuring well-loved characters. It can be accessed online: https://www.activelearnprimary.co.uk/login?c=0

Every pupil at Kensington has access to Bug club. They have their own unique usernames and passwords. We encourage children to read the books regularly and attempt the reading comprehension questions.

Reading Buddies
We are developing Reading Buddies at Kensington whereby children in KS2 are going to be paired up with children in KS1 to carry out reading sessions. These will provide opportunities for children to develop and teach reading skills. This will also provide younger children with role models, to promote their love of reading.

Reading across the Curriculum
In every lesson, teachers provide opportunities for children to develop their reading skills through core texts linked to topics. This ensures the development of skills as they are able to then apply it in different lessons, therefore different contexts.

E-Books
If you would like access to some fantastic eBooks, why not visit www.oxfordowl.co.uk. There are over 260 free books for parents to read with their child at home with lots of ideas on how to support your child with reading.

Phonics

At Kensington, we use RML to teach Phonics. We have daily phonics session where we learn about how to read and write using our phonic knowledge. We play lots of different phonic games which help us understand how sounds make words and we use words to make sentences. We use the Interactive Whiteboard to play games and learn new phonemes and graphemes.

Writing

We have imaginative and creative writers at Kensington Primary School.

Early Years
In Reception children use RML to begin writing, forming letters and have opportunities to write through a Literacy focus, which is supported by an adult.

KS1/KS2 – Writing journey
During English sessions, children have the opportunity to read and develop inference skills when exploring different genres. They then use these to develop different writing skills with a focus on grammar. Children are then given the opportunity to practice these skills and implement them in various tasks across a range of subjects. Finally, children are given the opportunity to apply these skills in a written outcome like a letter or a newspaper article etc.

SPAG
It is essential that spelling, punctuation and grammar is taught weekly across both key stages. Teachers devise sessions, which are interactive and engaging. Some sessions are taught as stand-alone lessons and others are taught as starters to the day’s literacy lesson.

Handwriting
At Kensington, our aim is that all children will be supported to develop a cursive handwriting style which is clear, joined and fluid. Inevitably some will be neater than others, but each child can acquire a consistent and fluent style. We believe this raises standards in writing in the early years, which will impact throughout the whole school, developing confidence, accuracy and fluency and improved presentation.

Targets
All children have individual writing targets. These are reviewed regularly by both teachers and the children. Children are also encouraged to reflect on their own learning and regularly self assess and peer assess.  

Kensington School Newspaper

Our school journalists are working hard to compile news articles based on the events happening within Kensington Primary School. They have had the opportunity to develop their journalistic skills, through interviewing people and writing these up using the features of news articles. Look out for our newspapers in the near future.

Speaking and Listening

We are currently the proud winners of the National Primary Debate Cup.

Opportunities
Children have the opportunity to develop their speaking and listening skills regularly in lessons through drama, role play, debates and other speaking and listening activities.

Why does Speaking and Listening matter?

  • Spoken language is at the heart of much human interaction, at home, at work and in society
  • Speaking and listening skills are a key aspect of employability
  • Good oral communication skills are important in other aspects of children’s lives such as in family and peer relationships
  • Speaking and listening are important in developing, understanding and embedding all aspects of learning.

Debate Club
We have a Debate club every Tuesday, where children are given the opportunities to discuss issues within the local community and around the world. Children attending regularly will also compete in different local and national competitions.

Curriculum
The new curriculum, devised by the government, puts a heavy emphasis on developing speaking and listening skills. These include children developing their vocabulary and using skills such as justification and reasoning in all the different subjects. Take the opportunity to talk to your children about their learning and ask them to explain what they have done in class and what they have learnt.

Competitions

We regularly enter various English related competitions throughout the year. We have many exciting competitions coming up. The following web links showcase some of the competitions we plan to enter this year.

Children's Profiles

Please find further information about what your child will be learning throughout the year. Should you wish for a more detailed explanation, please download the Primary National Curriculum document below.

English - The Year 1 Learner 

In English lessons, children are taught speaking, listening, reading and writing skills through studying a variety of styles of writing (genres). Teachers follow the Teaching Sequence for Writing, which means that children will first be taught to read and understand the text, then practice the skills of the style of writing (including grammar) and apply into their own writing. Some of the writing outcomes for Year 1 are the following: Stories with predictable phrasing; Recounts; Labels and captions; Instructions; Reports; Explanations; Traditional tales; Poetry and contemporary fiction reflecting children’s own experiences.

Core books your child will encounter are:
The Three Little Pigs
Little Red Riding Hood

Mad about Minibeasts by Giles Andreae
The Snail and the Whale by Julia Donaldson
The Pied Piper of Hamlin
Handa’s Surprise by Eileen Browne

The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss
Flat Stanley by Jeff Brown

Curriculum Content

Speaking and Listening
The children will become more familiar with and confident in using language. They will:

  • Listen to and discuss a wide range of books and poems
  • Learn some rhymes and poems to recite by heart
  • Discuss the meaning of words and extend vocabulary
  • Join in with discussions and explain their understanding
  • Change their speaking when taking on a role of a character during play

Reading

This part of the curriculum is broken down into ‘word reading’ and ‘comprehension’. In Year 1, pupils continue to learn to read words using phonics as well as learning to recognise words that cannot easily be sounded out. As well as being able to read words, children need to understand what they read and develop a life-long love of reading. They will learn to do this through carefully structured activities using a wide range of high-quality books. They are encouraged to:

  • Make links between their own experiences and the story
  • Check that they understand what they are reading
  • Talk about the title and the main events
  • Predict what might happen before they read it
  • Join in with predictable phrases

Writing

In Year 1 children develop their writing through the following areas:

Spelling

  • Spell words using phonics
  • Learn commonly used whole words that are difficult to sound out
  • Spell the days of the week
  • Begin to look at patterns and rules

Handwriting

  • Hold a pencil correctly
  • Form letters and digits correctly and confidently
  • Leave spaces between words

Composition

  • Speak in whole sentences
  • Write sequences of sentences
  • Re-read and check for sense
  • Develop a wide vocabulary
  • Use capital letters, full stops, question marks and exclamation marks
  • Join sentences with ‘and’

English - The Year 2 Learner  

In English lessons, children are taught speaking, listening, reading and writing skills through studying a variety of styles of writing (genres). Teachers follow the Teaching Sequence for Writing, which means that children will firstly be taught to read and understand the text, then practice the skills of the style of writing (including grammar) and apply into their own writing. Some of the writing outcomes for Year 2 are the following: Traditional tales, Recounts, Explanations, Poetry, Reports, Myths, Instructions, and Stories with recurring language.

Core texts your child will encounter are:
The Owl who was afraid of the dark by Jill Tomlinson
The Great Fire of London
My name is Bob by James Bowen
Paddington by Michael Bond
Dear Greenpeace by Simon James
The day the crayons quit by Drew Daywalt
The Tunnel by Anthony Browne
Chicken Licken by Russell Punter
The Charlie Moon Collection by Shirley Hughes

Curriculum Content

Speaking and listening

The children will become more familiar with and confident in using language in a greater variety of situations. They will, for example

  • Listen to and express views about a wide range of books and poems
  • Retell familiar stories and discuss the order of events
  • Build a bank of poems that they can recite by heart
  • Join in with discussions, ask questions and explain their understanding
  • Change their speaking for different purposes and audiences

Reading

This part of the curriculum is broken down into ‘word reading’ and ‘comprehension’. Pupils will be taught to read words fluently and speedily, using phonics as well as developing a growing bank of words that they recognise instantly. They will also be taught to check their own reading makes sense, and to re-read to correct when something doesn’t make sense. Children also need to understand what they read and develop a life-long love of reading. They will learn to do this through carefully structured activities using a wide range of high-quality books. They are encouraged to:

  • Make links between their own experiences and the story
  • Self-correct if what they are reading doesn’t make sense
  • Answer questions about a text, including questions where the answer is not obvious
  • Predict what might happen at various points in a story
  • Read a variety of non-fiction books

Writing
Children will develop their writing through the following areas;

Spelling

  • Continue to spell words using phonics
  • Learn commonly used whole words that are difficult to sound out
  • Understand more patterns and rules

Handwriting

  • Form cursive letters that are consistent in size
  • Leave appropriate spaces between words

Composition

  • Plan what they are going to write
  • Re-read and check for sense and accuracy
  • Write for a range of purposes
  • Develop a wide vocabulary
  • Develop their understanding and accuracy of punctuation
  • Use a range of words to join sentences and add details.

English - The Year 3 Learner  

In English lessons, children are taught speaking, listening, reading and writing skills through studying a variety of styles of writing (genres). Teachers follow the Teaching Sequence for Writing, which means that children will firstly be taught to read and understand the text, then practice the skills of the style of writing (including grammar) and apply into their own writing. Some of the writing outcomes for Year 3 are the following: Fables, Writing and performing a play, Recount, Instructions, Traditional tales, Adventure stories, Explanation and Persuasion.

Core texts your child will encounter are:
The Pebble in my Pocket by Meredith Hooper
Clause in the City by Alex T. Smith
Alice in Wonderland by Tim Burton
Children in History: Victorians by Kate Jackson
Funny Bones by Alan & Janet Ahlberg
Flat Stanley: The Great Egyptian Grave Robbery by Jeff Brown
Stig of the Dump by Clive King
Tom’s Midnight Garden by Philippa Pearce

Curriculum Content

Speaking and Listening

Children will be taught to discuss their learning and to develop speaking skills. They will become more familiar with and confident in, using language in a variety of situations, for a range of audiences and purposes. They will, for example

  • Develop their understanding of a subject through discussions, learning to give their opinions and listen to other view points
  • Speak clearly and in different ways for drama, formal presentations and debate

Reading

This part of the curriculum is broken down into ‘word reading’ and ‘comprehension’.
At this stage, word reading skills (including phonics) will continue to be taught, but the main focus will be helping children to understand what they are reading (comprehension). In comprehension children will be taught key skills to enable them to read, understand and enjoy a wide range of books. They will, for example,

  • Listen frequently to stories, poems, non-fiction and other writing
  • Ask and answer a range of questions about a text
  • Discuss ideas that are not obviously described in a text
  • Describe characters, summarise plots and predict what might happen next
  • Explore themes and conventions in a range of books e.g. good versus evil
  • Consider the effect of the author’s choice of language
  • Offer opinions about what they have read and justify their views

Writing

Writing is developed through teaching the following;

Spelling

Children should learn to spell new words correctly and have opportunities to practice spelling skills. They will begin to learn and use the words included in the National Curriculum for years 3 and 4. They will be taught spelling patterns and conventions, building on the spellings taught in Year 2.

Handwriting

This will continue to be taught, building on the joined writing; increasing consistency and fluency independently.

Composition

This includes vocabulary, grammar and punctuation. To develop their composition skills, the children will be taught to

  • Plan, draft, compose, edit and evaluate their writing
  • Use an increasing range of sentence structures
  • Write sentences that include when, where and why something happens
  • Write for a range of purposes and audiences as part of their work across the curriculum.
  • Check whether their work makes sense

Grammar will be taught throughout the writing process and teachers will follow the terms and concepts of the National Curriculum.

English - The Year 4 Learner 

In English lessons, children are taught speaking, listening, reading and writing skills through studying a variety of styles of writing (genres). Teachers follow the Teaching Sequence for Writing, which means that children will firstly be taught to read and understand the text, then practice the skills of the style of writing (including grammar) and apply into their own writing. Some of the writing outcomes for Year 4 are the following: Myths, Writing and performing plays, Stories with a theme, Story settings, Reports, Discussion, Explanation, Persuasion, and Poetry.

Core texts your child will encounter:
Oliver and the Seawigs by Philip Reeve and Sarah Mcintyre
How does sand become glass? By Melllisa Stewart
Greek Myths by Marcia Williams
The Iron Man by Ted Hughes
Jemmy Button by Jennifer Uman
Gorilla Journal by Carolyn Franklin
Cosmic Disco by Grace Nichols
Fantastic Mr. Fox by Roald Dahl
Child’s History of Britain by Anita Ganeri

Curriculum Content

Speaking and Listening
Children will be taught to discuss their learning and to develop speaking skills. They will become more familiar with and confident in, using language in a variety of situations, for a range of audiences and purposes. They will, for example,

  • Develop their understanding of a subject through discussions, learning to give and listen to opinions.
  • Speak clearly and in different ways for drama, formal presentations and debate

Reading
This part of the curriculum is broken down into ‘word reading’ and ‘comprehension’.
In word reading children will be taught to read and understand the meaning of new words using the skills they have learned previously and building on learning in year 3. Children will develop the fluency and stamina to read longer texts and the focus for the Year 4 learner is comprehension. Children will be taught key skills to enable them to read, understand and enjoy a wide range of books. They will, for example,

  • Summarise the main ideas of a text
  • Justify their opinion of particular characters
  • Discuss ideas that are not obviously described in a text e.g. ‘Explain why the character may have felt like this’
  • Note how the author chooses language to create a mood or atmosphere
  • Identify the structures or features of particular non- fiction texts

Writing
Writing is developed through teaching the following;

Spelling
Children should learn to spell new words correctly and have opportunities to practice spelling skills. They will be taught spelling patterns and conventions, building on the spellings taught in Year 3. They will continue to practice and use the words included in the National Curriculum for years 3 and 4.

Handwriting
This will continue to be taught, with the aim of increasing children’s consistency and fluency throughout their independent writing.

Composition
This includes vocabulary, grammar and punctuation. To develop their composition skills, the children will be taught to

  • Plan, draft, compose, edit and evaluate their writing
  • Organise their writing into clear paragraphs
  • Use an increasing range of sentence structures
  • Expand sentences by adding detail
  • Write for a range of purposes and audiences as part of their work across the curriculum

Grammar will be taught throughout the writing process and teachers will follow the terms and concepts of the National Curriculum.

English - The Year 5 Learner  

In English lessons, children are taught speaking, listening, reading and writing skills through studying a variety of styles of writing (genres). Teachers follow the Teaching Sequence for Writing, which means that children will firstly be taught to read and understand the text, then practice the skills of the style of writing (including grammar) and apply into their own writing. Some of the writing outcomes for Year 5 are the following: Legends, Suspense and mystery, Fiction (literary heritage), Recount, Explanation, Persuasion, Reports, Discussion, and Poetry.

Core texts your child will encounter:
Shackleton’s Journey by William Grill
1001 Arabian Nights by Geraldine McCaughrean
Watch out for the sprouts by Simon Bartram
East of the Sun, West of the Moon by Jackie Morris
What they don’t tell you about Anglo Saxon’s by Robert Fowke
The Princess’ Blankets by Carol Ann Duffy
The Viewer by Gary Crew and Shaun Tan
Varmints by Marc Craste
Skellig by David Almond


Curriculum Content

Speaking and Listening
Children will be taught to discuss their learning and to develop speaking skills. They will become familiar with and confident in, using language in a variety of situations, for a range of audiences/purposes. They will, for example:

  • Develop their understanding of a subject through discussions, learning to give and listen to opinions
  • Speak clearly and in different ways for drama, formal presentations and debate

Reading
This part of the curriculum is broken down into ‘word reading’ and ‘comprehension’. In year 5, pupils will be reading aloud a wider range of poetry and books written at an age-appropriate interest level with accuracy and at a reasonable speaking pace. Children will be expected to read frequently, outside as well as in school, for pleasure and information. They will have the opportunity to listen frequently to stories, poems, non-fiction and other writing. At this stage, word reading will not be directly taught, except where individuals need support. Instead the focus will be on the teaching of comprehension skills. They will, for example:

  • Retrieve, record and present information from a text
  • Summarise the main ideas of a text eg ‘loneliness’ or ‘friendship’
  • Predict what may happen based on evidence and clues given
  • Discuss and evaluate the text and justify their views
  • Use clues from the text to work out characters’ feeling, actions or motives
  • Distinguish between fact and opinion
  • Identify how language, structure and presentation add to the meaning

Writing
Writing is developed through teaching the following;

Spelling
Children should learn to spell new words correctly and have opportunities to practice spelling skills. They will be taught spelling patterns and conventions, and draw on their knowledge of word families and roots to help them spell new words correctly. They will practice and use the words included in the National Curriculum for years 5 and 6. Children will be expected to use a dictionary and thesaurus.

Handwriting
Pupils will continue to be taught handwriting in order to increase speed, fluency and legibility.

Composition
This includes vocabulary, grammar and punctuation. To develop composition skills, children will be taught to:

  • Plan, draft, compose, edit and evaluate their writing
  • Use a wide variety of punctuation and grammar features
  • Select the appropriate grammar and vocabulary to develop the effectiveness of their writing
  • Use a range of techniques to build detail into their writing and link ideas within and between paragraphs
  • Adapt writing for a range of purposes and audiences as part of their work across the curriculum

Grammar will be taught throughout the writing process and teachers will follow the terms and concepts of the National Curriculum.

English - The Year 6 Learner 

In English lessons, children are taught speaking, listening, reading and writing skills through studying a variety of styles of writing (genres). Teachers follow the Teaching Sequence for Writing, which means that children will firstly be taught to read and understand the text, then practice the skills of the style of writing (including grammar) and apply into their own writing. Some of the writing outcomes for Year 6 are the following: Short stories, Extended narratives, Explanations, Recounts, Reports, Persuasion, Discussion, Debating skills, and Poetry.

Core texts your child will encounter:
Goodnight Mr Tom by Michelle Magorian
Under a Bomber’s Moon by Stephen Harris
Blitzed Brits by Terry Deary
Diary of Anne Frank
Sensational by Roger McGough
Beowulf by Kevin Crossley-Holland and Charles Keeping
Zeus and the Rise of the Olympians by Ryan Foley
Macbeth by William Shakespeare
Charles Darwin Biography
Kensuke’s Kingdom by Michael Mopurgo

Curriculum Content

Speaking and Listening
Children will be taught to discuss their learning and to develop speaking skills. They will become more familiar with and confident in, using language in a variety of situations, for a range of audiences and purposes. They will, for example:

  • Develop their understanding of a subject through discussions, learning to give and listen to opinions
  • Speak clearly and in different ways for drama, formal presentations and debate
  • Prepare work orally, through drama and role play, discussing, rehearsing and recording their ideas

Reading
This part of the curriculum is broken down into ‘word reading’ and ‘comprehension’. Children will be encouraged to work out unfamiliar words that they meet. Children will also be taught key comprehension skills to enable them to read, understand and enjoy a wider range of fiction, poetry, plays and non-fiction. They will, for example:

  • Identify and discuss themes and conventions across a wide range of writing and compare texts
  • Predict what may happen based on evidence and clues given
  • Give responses to texts and recommend books to peers, giving reasons for views and choices
  • Use clues from the text to work out characters’ feeling, actions or motives and give evidence.
  • Discuss and evaluate how authors use language and effect on the reader

Writing
Writing is developed through teaching the following;

Spelling
Children should learn to spell new words correctly and have opportunities to practice spelling skills. They will be taught spelling patterns and conventions, and draw on their knowledge of word families and roots to help them spell new words correctly. They will continue to practice and use the words included in the National Curriculum for years 5 and 6. Children will be expected to use a dictionary and thesaurus.

Handwriting
Pupils will continue to be taught handwriting in order to increase speed, fluency and legibility.

Composition
This includes vocabulary, grammar and punctuation. To develop their composition skills, the children will be taught to

  • Plan, draft, compose, edit and evaluate their writing
  • Use a wide variety of punctuation and grammar features with confidence
  • Refine their grammar and vocabulary to further develop the effectiveness of their writing
  • Use a wider range of techniques to build detail into their writing and ensure it flows smoothly
  • Build on their understanding of the differences between Standard and non-standard English
  • Adapt writing for a range of purposes and audiences as part of their work across the curriculum

Grammar will be taught throughout the writing process and teachers will follow the terms and concepts of the National Curriculum.

Web Links

  • Tapscott Learning Trust
  • Ofsted Outstanding Logo
  • Music Mark
  • Sainsburys School Games 14/15
  • RE Quality Bronze
  • Bronze Star 2016
  • Eco-Schools Silver Award
  • TES School Award
  • Primary Geography Quality Mark
  • Primary Science Quality Mark
  • SSAT Educational Outcomes 2016
  • Autism Education Trust